Media Files
Title:
John Jake Pfisterer
Collection:
Oral Histories
Organization:
BONDURANT HISTORY
Duration:
00:29:44
Agent:
Interviewee John Jake Pfisterer
Publisher Wyoming State Archives
Title:
John Jake Pfisterer Oral History
Subject:
personal name John Jake Pfisterer
geographic term Wyoming ranchers
corporate name Wyoming State Archives
geographic term Bondurant-Wyoming
topical term Wyoming-History
Description:
general
Wyoming rancher John "Jake" Pfisterer talks about his life and memories in the Hoback Basin - now called Bondurant. This interview was recorded in approximately the mid-1980's.

Agent:
Interviewee John Jake Pfisterer
Publisher Wyoming State Archives
Duration:
00:29:44
Type:
Oral History
No index available for this file.
INTERVIEWER 1: OK,
Jake, start out.
You're off and running.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, I
don't know where to start.
INTERVIEWER 1: You
were born, I think.
JAKE PFISTERER: Is that
where you want to start?
INTERVIEWER 1: Just as well.
What were you like
when you were a kid?
INTERVIEWER 2:
Where were you born?
INTERVIEWER 2:
Were you born here?
INTERVIEWER 3: No, I
didn't know that, no.
JAKE PFISTERER: I was born
here in Bondurant on the family
ranch in August the 5th, 1913,
and lived nearly all my life,
and have seen a lot of
changes from a little one room
schoolhouse we used to ski
and ride horseback to--
is that--
CREW: Mm-hm, yeah, it's cool.
JAKE PFISTERER: Mrs. Booker was
the teacher for three years.
She used to ride from the
from the Bondurant post office
up here in 40 below 0 weather
with a pair of rubber boots on.
And she was probably one
of the toughest persons
that was ever in this country.
[LAUGHS] Now what else
do you want to hear?
INTERVIEWER 3: Where was
that school house located?
INTERVIEWER 1: It's
right over here
where the present
trailer house here.
JAKE PFISTERER:
This schoolhouse is
located where Saunders trailer
house is at the present time.
And we went to school there
through the eighth grade.
INTERVIEWER 2: OK, [INAUDIBLE].
Can you name the ones who were
the head of school [INAUDIBLE]??
JAKE PFISTERER: Part of
them, through those years,
there was a Myrna Query, and
Alan and Bella Mathison, Mickey
Hicks, and Bill Hicks,
Kelly and Ruth Hicks,
and Milton Robinson,
her brother, Jane,
and I. And for a short
while, there was a--
Walt McPherson's son went
there for a short while.
And now what do
we want it to be?
INTERVIEWER 1: Did you go
to school-- did the bus
come around and pick you up?
JAKE PFISTERER: [LAUGHS]
We rode horseback
until the snow got too deep,
and then we skied to school.
And same way in the spring,
after the snow broke,
why, we'd ride horseback again.
That was a great day when you
could get off of those skis.
INTERVIEWER 3: Did you
live then where you now do?
INTERVIEWER 1: Did
they have to board out
to go to high school
in those days,
or did you end it
at the eighth grade?
JAKE PFISTERER: I never
went to high school.
I went to business
college in Los Angeles.
INTERVIEWER 1: What did you
do from the time you got out
of your eighth grade to the time
you went to business school?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
just missed one year.
INTERVIEWER 1:
Oh, just one year.
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, then
went to business school.
INTERVIEWER 1: When did you
go to this business school?
INTERVIEWER 1: What
year did you go
to these business school, LA?
JAKE PFISTERER:
'29, '30, I believe.
INTERVIEWER 1: Did
the depression--
did you notice much
difference when
the depression came in '30?
Was there much
change in the area?
Were they tightening things up?
Or was there any
difference, or--
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, it was
quite a little difference.
Cattle was worth around
$0.03, $0.04 a pound,
and yearling steers, we had them
bring $4.20 in Omaha one year.
And so it's quite
a change from--
INTERVIEWER 1: What a
freight cost you then,
to send to Omaha?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, it
cost about $1 a hundred
to go to Omaha.
INTERVIEWER 1: So you'd
come up with a $4 bill
for your critters, about?
Or you sold yearlings
or calves in those days?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Yearlings, they would--
imagine you'd come up with
about, say, 728, around $20,
time you paid the freight.
INTERVIEWER 1: That
was better I thought.
INTERVIEWER 1: [INAUDIBLE]
camels, ship them on to town.
You had to pay the bills.
SUBJECT 1: Don't take
with all that vitamin.
[LAUGHS]
INTERVIEWER 1: Seemed to me
Lenny told me about that one
time that they
shipped the cattle,
and they owed the freight
bill on the thing.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
I know one year they
sent some cattle
to Ogden, I think
them and Bakers, and
maybe Franz, and Koontz,
and they come up, I
guess, but hardly get
the freight out them.
INTERVIEWER 2: Jake,
could you tell us
about the old Bondurant,
old town [INAUDIBLE]??
Was the whole town--
INTERVIEWER 2: Not [INAUDIBLE]
JAKE PFISTERER: No, not really.
They used to run a
hunting camp there.
And I suppose took in
some overnight people,
but it wasn't really a hotel.
He used to run a
store there, a grocery
store, and had the post office.
INTERVIEWER 3: Had you
left Bondurant ever
when you went to LA to school?
INTERVIEWER 2: Had you
ever left Bondurant
before you went to LA?
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh
yeah, I mean, I'd
been to Arizona and
California both.
INTERVIEWER 3: What did
you think of LA, though,
after Bondurant?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
it is different.
[LAUGHS] I've never been back.
I'd like to go back
and see if I could
recognize any of the places.
INTERVIEWER 3: How
long were you there?
INTERVIEWER 1: Whereabouts
in LA was this school?
JAKE PFISTERER: It was
right off of Broadway.
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, downtown--
JAKE PFISTERER:
Downtown LA, yeah.
Used to ride the streetcar.
You could ride the
streetcars for $0.05.
And the ladies that
knew their way around,
they'd keep getting transfers.
They could ride all
over Los Angeles,
and come back within a
block of where they started
from for a nickel, shopping.
INTERVIEWER 1:
Well, that's clever.
INTERVIEWER 1: When did your
dad come to the country?
INTERVIEWER 1: And he
homesteaded the V Bar V
beginning at this time?
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, he
homesteaded the V Bar V
property, the present
property owned
by Roy and Pfisterer family.
INTERVIEWER 1: When did he--
did he put the two pieces
of property at the 320
together at this particular
time, or did Van Vleck do that?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Van Vleck did that.
He bought Dad's homestead,
and then he homesteaded 160.
Then your dad then
moved up here?
Or did he buy a piece,
or did he re-homestead?
JAKE PFISTERER: No, he
bought this off of Faler.
INTERVIEWER 2: Which
Faler was that?
INTERVIEWER 1: And this is Lynn.
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh gee,
I think about 1910.
INTERVIEWER 1: So you were
born three years later,
after he was up here, then.
How did your ranch grow?
In other words, so
he now had 160 acres.
What else did you buy then?
At that time, did
he get a 320, a 480?
How did your ranch grow?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Well, at that time,
Arthur Faler's
mother also had a--
she had 196 acre desert claim.
And he bought it and Arthur's
160 at the same time.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now where
was the desert claim?
Is that up toward their highway,
or down toward the post office?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, I think
it was down in the valley,
because Arthur's had his
buildings just up there,
just about where the gravel pit
is across from our meadow now.
INTERVIEWER 1: And your
dad built your house today,
that you live in today?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
he had it built.
INTERVIEWER 1: Well,
yeah, what I mean is--
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, oh yeah.
INTERVIEWER 1: Wasn't
something he bought.
JAKE PFISTERER: No, at
that, when he bought,
there was no
buildings down there.
Everything was up
here at the highway.
INTERVIEWER 1: How big was the
ranch then, when you took over?
In other words, you now
have quite a bit of land.
You bought the Robertson place?
What's the next one down?
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, we bought
the Robertson, and the Watts,
and the McPherson.
INTERVIEWER 1: You bought
three more ranches.
JAKE PFISTERER: And
the Noble places.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now these you
bought about the beginning
of World War II.
Is this correct,
or is [INAUDIBLE]??
JAKE PFISTERER: Long
about there somewhere.
INTERVIEWER 1: And this is
the legends that I heard,
that the Boer War
came, and people
got tired of living
on Mount [INAUDIBLE]..
They sold [INAUDIBLE].
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
yeah, and some of them
wanted to get out of the
snow and, like Robinson--
she was having heart trouble
with the high altitude.
And they wanted to get
her to a lower altitude.
So just one thing and another.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now is
Robinson the one who built
the fort on Fortress Hill?
JAKE PFISTERER: No,
that was Arthur Faler.
INTERVIEWER 1: Oh,
Arthur built that.
INTERVIEWER 3: And
is it Arthur's grave
that's over on the hill?
INTERVIEWER 3: Is it Arthur's
grave that's over on the stack
by the hill?
JAKE PFISTERER: No,
that's his father.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now
these relations, this
is the same relations as
the Faler's Store today
in Pinedale?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Yeah, same family.
I believe, if I've got this
right, Harold's father,
I believe, with a brother
to Arthur Faler's father,
but I'm not absolutely
sure on that.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now the Faler
dude camp she used to have
down here, is this
something that they
would have in the summertime,
the same family again?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Well, part of that--
I think some of the
relation or the family,
they've been in that.
Vint, he was in--
Vint, I believe,
was Harold's father,
and he was in the dude
business for years.
INTERVIEWER 1: And then
they had this camp, which
is now the [INAUDIBLE] camp.
JAKE PFISTERER: Arthur
Faler, he used to--
at one time, he had this
homestead up here right
across from your
[INAUDIBLE] place there,
the Johnson place we have.
And that's how come the old
man was buried up there.
Guess he got kind
of cantankerous
with his wife, or Mrs.
Faler, and so she run off,
and went up there to the boys.
And the old man come
over to get her,
and Arthur told him she
wasn't going back with him.
And he started to
pull his rifle,
and Arthur was standing with
a six-shooter in his hand,
in the wagon box
with a six-shooter.
And when the old man started to
pull his rifle, he killed him.
INTERVIEWER 1: His
own son shot him.
JAKE PFISTERER: And
that's how come he's
buried there on Stub Creek.
INTERVIEWER 1: Just buried
him where he fell, huh?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
[LAUGHS] you might say so.
INTERVIEWER 1: They didn't
scalp him, did they?
JAKE PFISTERER: [LAUGHS]
Well, I don't think so.
INTERVIEWER 3: Aren't there some
more graves over [INAUDIBLE],,
up back here?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
there's several,
or it was, I guess, right
on this hill from your fence
on around the hill
on that hilltop.
There's three or four.
I can't tell you who's they
are with the exception of Bandy
Bowlsby's grandfather
is buried there.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
he was Bill's father
and Perry's father.
INTERVIEWER 1: Yes, but
I've never heard of this.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, I think
he was probably died shortly
after they come in here.
INTERVIEWER 1: Ah, that's
why he's [INAUDIBLE]..
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, I
know where his grave is,
but that's the only one I know.
Though I've heard there's
several over there.
And then there's
this Shorty Burnett,
he's buried right over
here, right up from Dawkins,
on that little hill.
INTERVIEWER 3: Now, who was he?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, he
homesteaded that place
up there that's Harrison bought
on the head of the river,
you know?
And then there's another grave--
Snell Johnson and
Mrs. Johnson, they
lost a baby there one winter.
And my dad and somebody
else, I don't know, come by,
and then he was gone.
She was there alone,
and this baby died.
And they took the baby up on
the hill there and buried it.
And I don't know where
that one is either.
INTERVIEWER 2: What,
back on this ridge
right out here in back?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
the [INAUDIBLE]---- no,
it's right straight out from the
old Query buildings down here,
back this way.
That's where they buried it.
SUBJECT 1: Tom
[INAUDIBLE],, he used
to be up here in
the basin, you know.
SUBJECT 1: He talked about,
I think that must be the one.
But I [INAUDIBLE]
back before Bill.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, if
Tom told you about it,
maybe that was the time they
buried that Mary Jane Hiatt.
INTERVIEWER 1: Wasn't
she buried there
where the old place
with the fireplace
chimney sticking up
across from Triangle S?
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah,
up on the hill there,
and down a little ways.
INTERVIEWER 2: Jake, are
the buildings still standing
where the Querys lived?
INTERVIEWER 2: Where Jake
Query and his family lived?
Yes,
JAKE PFISTERER: They're
the one that-- you
know where Daisy lives.
JAKE PFISTERER: Those old
buildings right down below
that is where--
SUBJECT 1: Myrna and I were
the little freshmen in school
together.
SUBJECT 1: And she
stayed with Callahan
when she was a freshman.
She was married to one
of my very best friends.
JAKE PFISTERER: She
was in the eighth grade
when I was in the second.
SUBJECT 1: Oh, yeah,
because I was born in 1906.
Yeah, she was in
the eighth grade.
She went with me one year
here, and then graduated.
Or, I mean, she'd gone before,
but she went one year with me,
or rather I went
one year with her.
That's the way it would be.
INTERVIEWER 3: Can you tell us
any of the history of Dead Shot
Ranch?
If there is any?
I've just heard--
INTERVIEWER 1: How'd
Dead Shot get his name?
JAKE PFISTERER: Dead
Shot, how he got his name?
Well, sir, he went
out hunting once,
and these two bull
elk were fighting.
When they crossed
their necks, he
shot, and broke
both their necks.
So after that, they
called him Dead Shot.
INTERVIEWER 3: What was
his last name, Jake?
I don't know if it was
Swenson or Swanson.
INTERVIEWER 1: When was
he working or supplying
meat to the [INAUDIBLE]
out over the Rim?
JAKE PFISTERER: I
couldn't tell you.
I never knew him
until he was in here.
It could've been
before that, but--
INTERVIEWER 3: Jake,
did you hunting
with your dad very much?
INTERVIEWER 3: Did you go
hunting your dad very much?
JAKE PFISTERER: Not too much.
Dad didn't-- he
didn't like elk meat,
after he got raising
a few cattle,
he wouldn't kill an elk.
[LAUGHTER]
INTERVIEWER 2: [LAUGHS]
Tired of the elk, honey.
JAKE PFISTERER:
Tired of elk meat.
INTERVIEWER 1: Well,
these boys ought to know.
What now-- if you had chores
to do in your days, Jake,
what happened?
Now what time did you get up
and go to school in the morning?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well,
we'd get up at 5 o'clock,
and milk the cows.
And get ready, like when
we used to ski to school,
we'd usually leave
around 7:30, and--
INTERVIEWER 1: How
many cows did you milk?
JAKE PFISTERER: Not
many, one or two apiece.
INTERVIEWER 1:
One or two apiece.
You hear that, boys?
One or two apiece
[INAUDIBLE] is one.
how much did [INAUDIBLE] cost?
INTERVIEWER 4: How much
did [INAUDIBLE] cost?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Gee, I don't know.
We didn't buy any in those days.
I couldn't tell you.
[LAUGHS]
INTERVIEWER 2: [LAUGHS]
No, thank you, now.
INTERVIEWER 1: Did
you have work to do
when you came home from school?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, we usually
always had to get in the wood,
and split the wood, and
carry it in of a night.
And usually had to milk.
INTERVIEWER 1: Did y'all
feed during the weekends?
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh yeah, yeah
we always had to help feed.
The job we always
hated the worst
was about this time of
year when we'd have to saw
and split up enough
wood for summer by hand.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now this
is when you-- the woodpile
is all piled up out there so
you didn't have to go to timber
to get it.
JAKE PFISTERER: No, we always
got our wood out in the fall
before the snow came.
INTERVIEWER 1: Now, of course,
you had a chainsaw to go ahead
and saw it up with.
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh yeah, yes.
[LAUGH] Those old
dog claws cuts it.
Nobody ever knew how to sharpen.
INTERVIEWER 1: Well,
was it the two-man job?
Your brother got on one end,
and you were on the other end,
and you just started
whacking them off?
JAKE PFISTERER: No, we always
just used the single saws.
One man, yeah.
SUBJECT 1: I can
remember, though,
like you said, in spring
here, and by this time, boy,
would they have [INAUDIBLE].
Pile of wood's left.
JAKE PFISTERER: Split
up for a summer.
Yeah.
[INAUDIBLE]
SUBJECT 1: Hardest
spring work came on you.
Y'all did a good job.
It was all at one time.
INTERVIEWER 1: I imagine you
didn't like it all that much.
INTERVIEWER 1: I imagine
you didn't like it.
SUBJECT 1: Butcher the hogs--
did you butcher the hogs, too?
We never did raise
a great lot of hogs.
We butchered some.
I raised a few, but not
like a lot of people did.
SUBJECT 1: Then after
the hams were cured,
mom used to take them and
wrap them in newspapers,
and then bury them
in oat [INAUDIBLE]..
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, that used
to be the way they'd do it.
Well, of course, we never
did, because we never
did have any oats or grain.
But I bought some once in
Jackson from some people,
and they had hundreds
of hams and shoulders.
Well, this guy killed about
60 hogs, and cured them,
and then he was
selling them that way.
And he had a big bin
of grain, and that's
where he had them stored.
INTERVIEWER 3: Do you remember
how much you paid for them?
I can't remember--
been a long time ago.
INTERVIEWER 1: What
used to be wages
when you were a boy, Jake?
I mean, what would a good
hired man, really a first rate
hired man make in those days?
JAKE PFISTERER: About
$30 a month in beans.
INTERVIEWER 1: And is this the
old saying of a steer a month?
I mean, was a steer worth
about $30 in those days?
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, it would
kind of depend on the market,
you know?
Probably just about
that time, maybe.
INTERVIEWER 1: In the early
days, in the '20s to the '30s,
money didn't change too much.
Prices never changed, or
fluctuated to the degrees
we know today.
INTERVIEWER 1: But
how long did this
steer a month per man
thing last, I mean,
before it no longer was viable?
JAKE PFISTERER: Gee,
I can't remember.
INTERVIEWER 1: The '30s,
you know, '34, or 5, 6, 8?
JAKE PFISTERER: Around '34 was
probably about as tough a times
for this country as
there was on account
of the drought,
droughts and bangs.
INTERVIEWER 4: Did you have
any winter carnivals here?
INTERVIEWER 4: Did you
have any winter carnivals
during the year?
No, they used to have ski
parties, and the kids,
and the men, and
the ladies would all
go and ski to some place, and
then stay all night, maybe.
Or, well, they'd ski all
day, and then stay all night,
and go back the next
morning on the crust,
usually when the
snow was crusted,
like it is like
this time of year.
They'd stay all night, and go
back home the next morning.
INTERVIEWER 3: Didn't they used
to have a rodeo around here
open, with no fences?
JAKE PFISTERER:
Yes, they used to.
In those days, the 4th
of July was a great day.
A lot of the [INAUDIBLE]
people would come in here.
They'd have a rodeo, and
right down there at the--
right below Cliff
Creek was one of the--
What?
INTERVIEWER 1: They'd
go to this spot?
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, it was
that sagebrush flat there was
one of the main places they'd--
people, they'd come in and
camp, and maybe spend a week.
And they'd have a rodeo,
and drink moonshine whiskey,
and really have
a time, you know?
INTERVIEWER 2: What,
a mountain, a creek?
JAKE PFISTERER: Right around the
curve, going towards Jackson.
And then they had
another pet spot
was up there in that Vince
Fronk's homestead over there,
and crossed on this side of the
creek, in that park in there.
They always called that
the picnic grounds.
A lot of people
would come in there
and spend, from the
outside, and maybe camp
there four or five days,
or a week, and fish.
And they'd have a
rodeo there times.
INTERVIEWER 1: Well, now was
this a more important rodeo
at that time than, say,
the Big Piney Rodeo?
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh no,
this was just a kind of a--
it wasn't really a rodeo.
They just had maybe
a few horses they'd
buck, and have a few horse
races, and like that.
Back in those days,
they used to really have
a real rodeo like at Piney.
They'd have the bucking,
and then the roping,
and they'd have
dozens of horse races.
They'd have bin box
races, and they'd
have chariot race,
forehead to the chariot,
and they would have
a novelty race.
That was, the horse--
you'd walk him a third of the
distance around the track,
and trot him in a third, and
then run him the last third.
And then they'd
have relay races.
And the racing was one
of the biggest events
of a rodeo in those olden days.
JAKE PFISTERER:
[LAUGHS] It was--
SUBJECT 1: They'd have
the riled horse race--
SUBJECT 1: --where
they'd ride out.
JAKE PFISTERER: Oh
yeah, they always
had riled horse race, too.
SUBJECT 1: Blindfold them,
[INAUDIBLE] sack or something,
and they'll do a bit of
that, and then get off.
See who could get there first,
if you could get them or not.
And they're riding in
the wrong direction.
JAKE PFISTERER: You
might have seen this.
Once there was a rodeo in
Jackson when I was a kid,
and there's this fellow by
the name of Keith Blair.
INTERVIEWER 1: I remember him.
JAKE PFISTERER:
You remember him?
And he was the best relay
racer in the country.
But anyway, this one
time on the last horse,
he didn't get his
saddle cinched,
and he took that saddle
out from under himself
on that horse on the dead
run, and come in carrying it
on his shoulder, bareback.
And they disqualified him.
[LAUGHS] You talk
about the betting--
there was a lot of mad
men that lost their money
on him, all this--
SUBJECT 1: [INAUDIBLE].
JAKE PFISTERER:
Did you see that?
He was in the bedroom.
INTERVIEWER 1: He came up,
and he just pulled it up
from underneath him, and
he put it in his butt.
SUBJECT 2: Stayed with his
horse and had his saddle.
Yeah, and he won the race.
JAKE PFISTERER: No, he didn't.
SUBJECT 2: Well, I
think he should have.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, depends
on where you had your money.
[LAUGHS]
[INTERPOSING VOICES]
INTERVIEWER 1: What
it looked like to me,
if a man can come in with
everything all hooked to him,
I can't see how
they disqualify him.
JAKE PFISTERER: Well, you're--
JAKE PFISTERER: You're supposed
to cinch that saddle up.
[LAUGHS]
INTERVIEWER 1: Oh, I see, OK.
JAKE PFISTERER: [LAUGHS] But all
the smart money was bet on him,
see?
Because he always won,
and this time he didn't.
[LAUGHS]
INTERVIEWER 1:
Well, somebody who's
betting a long shot that
time come out pretty well.
JAKE PFISTERER:
[LAUGHS] You bet.
Because they could get
pretty good odds on Blair.
SUBJECT 1: Anybody who's had
a really good walking horse,
[INAUDIBLE].
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, they were
the ones that could win it.
SUBJECT 1: They had the
edge on them [INAUDIBLE]..
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah,
if you got out there
50 or 100 feet before the
others got to the line,
it'd be halfway around.
SUBJECT 1: [INAUDIBLE].
INTERVIEWER 3: [INAUDIBLE]
building [INAUDIBLE]??
INTERVIEWER 4: Yeah,
I see on this ridge,
there's a building up there.
JAKE PFISTERER: There's what?
INTERVIEWER 3: Pat's
talking about it.
INTERVIEWER 4: There's a
building up here on this ridge,
and just half of it's showing.
JAKE PFISTERER: You mean
right here by the trailer?
INTERVIEWER 4: No, right through
one of these cliffs out here,
right above the crypt.
JAKE PFISTERER: Yeah, well,
it used to be the old fly shed
for the kids' and
the teachers' horses,
to get them out of the flies.
My dad built that to keep
the flies off the horses.
We used to go to
school in the summer.
SUBJECT 2: That's summer school.
JAKE PFISTERER: But
did for a long time,
then when I went
to winter school.
Of course, they
used it then to--
in the fall, Dad would
haul a load of hay
over, and throw it
on top of the thing,
and then have hay to
feed your saddle horses.
But that's what that was.
This area here used to
be where the big elk
migration went through.
They came over this
hill right here.
And if you've ever
been up on a hill
and noticed that big deep
trail, and coming off of there?
First time you're up there, why